Hi, Nice Towhee Meet You

How to Identify a Towhee

Towhees: these robin-sized sparrows are no drab LBJs

The rufous towhees sport a baggy three-piece-suit: a loose jacket on their back; an orange vest on their sides; and a plain white shirt covering their breast. A deep black head and beak surround bright amber eyes.

Yet towhee attire varies slightly by sex and species. Males don dark black while females appear dirty brown- or gray-black. White frill is sparse on the eastern towhee, but plentiful on the western spotted towhee.

An acrobatic spotted towhee at William L. Finley Wildlife Refuge near Corvallis, Oregon.

Although distinctively dressed, towhees are more often heard than seen. Once called “chewinks” (for the sound of one of their calls) spotted towhees—more vocal than their eastern counterparts—have a few quirky calls that catch the ear of passers-by. Listen especially for soft trills during spring and summer and the sound of a towhee’s favorite activity: scratching through mats of leaves!

Come Autumn, Some Plants Provide Towhee Treats

First a catlike “mewww”questions from the thickets, “is anyone listening to me?” Then a constant scratching. A towhee! 

You can find this unusually large and colorful sparrow across the continental United States—year-round in the southern U.S. and migrating to northern states in the spring.

Leaf lovers, towhees find places without an overabundance of fallen leaves inhospitable. The towhee will acquiesce with the edges of a park or an infrequently manicured yard. But to the towhee, the scrubbier, brushier, or leafier, the better. 

A spotted towhee singing at dusk in a forest in northern California.

Near water or in temperate climates, towhees are common. They live where deciduous plants thrive, plants that give shelter and food both to towhees and insects that seek refuge in the rich layer of decomposing leaves.

If you’re lucky enough to spot a towhee in an arid climate, you’re either walking along a perennial stream or standing in a watered backyard adorned with broadleaf shrubs. Most of the desert does not supply the towhees with enough dead leaves to loudly rummage through.

For example, in the arid intermountain region or the southwest, where willow and cottonwood buffer softly flowing waters and drop plenty of leaves, these goofy sparrows play to their utmost pleasure. And in the Pacific northwest, spotted towhees are common throughout the rainforest, at home rummaging in the moist and dense underbrush.

spotted towhee
Spotted towhee in my parents’ yard in Washington.

Yard Towhees

To attract this oversized rufous-sided sparrow to your yard, try planting native shrubs that drop their leaves every fall and provide dense tangles low to the ground for sparrow shelter. It’s also good practice to offer a birdbath and keep cats, songbirds’ top predator, inside. 

The key for towhees: don’t rake up all of those dead leaves. If you leave the leaf litter alone, the bugs and birds will thank you.

P.S. I didn’t forget about these critters, but they’re a different animal.

How to find 10 Warblers this Spring

Tips to find the most popular and colorful birds in the Northeast

They’re tiny.

They’re colorful.

They’re loud.

They’re often foraging high in the leafiest canopies, making them impossible to see even while bending over backwards.

See below, the Blackburnian Warbler with bright orange throat, notorious for foraging way high up.

Despite the challenges of watching warblers, or perhaps because of them, these birds are among the most anticipated of all the spring arrivals to the northeast.

But how do you find them?!

8 Tips to find 10 Warblers

Tip #1: look in the canopy. Many warblers like to flit and fly in the treetops, so keep your eyes and ears pointed skyward. (Disclaimer: talk to your chiropractor before taking my advice.)

Tip #2: warblers are songbirds. Males bellow a unique tune to mark their territory during breeding season. Learn the codes and you can unlock the secret to finding new and different species of warbler.

What is the best way to find a fire-throated angel, that Blackburnian warbler? Learn its song or play the recording in your ear to jog your memory when you’re in the field. If you hear one in the treetops, sometimes you can follow its foraging through the branches for a better look (but don’t hold your breath).

Continue reading “How to find 10 Warblers this Spring”

5 Favorite Pacific Northwest Birds and How to Find Them

On a fine Tuesday morning in the Pacific Northwest, if you asked me what my favorite birds are I would say “the towhees I saw on the path to work.”

During the summer, it’s probably the shorebird I could find on the beach. But when I’m feeling restless for a fun-loving songbird, it’s that tiny always present kinglet.

towhee singing
Spotted Towhee

The point is—I don’t exactly have 5 rigidly defined favorite Pacific Northwest birds.

But with the variety of habitats in the northwest, it’s not a bad thing to have a favorite bird for every occasion.

Austin Schuver pacific northwest bird guide