How to find 10 Warblers this Spring

Tips to find the most popular and colorful birds in the Northeast

They’re tiny.

They’re colorful.

They’re loud.

They’re often foraging high in the leafiest canopies, making them impossible to see even while bending over backwards.

See below, the Blackburnian Warbler with bright orange throat, notorious for foraging way high up.

The best way to find a fire-throated angel? Learn its song (or play the recording in your ear when you’re in the forest to jog your memory). If you hear one in the treetops, sometimes you can wait for it to come down—but don’t hold your breath—or follow its foraging through the tree branches for a better look.

Despite the challenges of watching warblers, or perhaps because of them, these birds are among the most anticipated of all the spring arrivals to the northeast.

But how do you find them?!

8 Tips to find 10 Warblers

Tip #1: look in the canopy. Many warblers like to flit and fly in the treetops, so keep your eyes and ears pointed skyward. (Disclaimer: talk to your chiropractor before taking my advice literally.)

Tip #2: warblers are songbirds. Males bellow a unique tune to mark their territory during breeding season. Learn the codes and you can unlock the secret to finding new and different species of warbler.

Continue reading “How to find 10 Warblers this Spring”

5 Favorite Pacific Northwest Birds and How to Find Them

On a fine Tuesday morning in the Pacific Northwest, if you asked me what my favorite birds are I would say “the towhees I saw on the path to work.”

During the summer, it’s probably the shorebird I could find on the beach. But when I’m feeling restless for a fun-loving songbird, it’s that tiny always present kinglet.

towhee singing
Spotted Towhee

The point is—I don’t exactly have 5 rigidly defined favorite Pacific Northwest birds.

But with the variety of habitats in the northwest, it’s not a bad thing to have a favorite bird for every occasion.

Austin Schuver pacific northwest bird guide