The Story of an Hour

A Summer Poem

A raindrop tells the story of an hour;
when a cloud comes to life in a day.

A bumblebee waits out the passing shower;
while a wildflower sees the season pass away.

A tanager tells the story of the canopy;
as a snake slithers along the forest floor.

An oak bears its weight patiently;
while a lichen outlasts everything before.

As it happens, from big to small, from fast to tall;
but a child can tell the story of them all.

Inspired by the last few weeks of wandering around in the woods—searching for owls in the dark (without success), the coming and going of wildflowers, seeing hungry fledgling chicks all around, and thinking about the limits of time and perspective.

Revel in summer: watch my short film from a lighthouse 11 miles off the coast of Maine.

Latest Posts

Black Lives Matter in Enumclaw: Letter from Constituents

I’m writing a letter to my hometown city council to show support for Black Lives Matter and demand change in the ways our public institutions approach policing and racism.

I tailored this letter to my rural community that lacks much of any diversity, but you can download this template to craft your own.


Dear Enumclaw City Council,

Today, Enumclaw is overwhelmingly white, but it is not insulated from police violence and systemic racism. The murders of George Floyd or Breonna Taylor or numerous others—those could happen here.

As Enumclaw grows—seemingly by the day—our community will become home to more Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC). It is our responsibility as a community to ensure that Enumclaw is safe, welcoming, and committed to dismantling the racist structures that have oppressed BIPOC and taken away their livelihood and lives. It’s in all of our best interests to build a more inclusive community and we all must take the responsibility to do so.

We are in a moment of nationwide action to fundamentally redesign our public institutions. Voicing concern about recent acts of police brutality or showing support for Black Lives Matter is not enough. Citizens of Enumclaw, your constituents, expect that our community leaders will rise to the occasion. 

Here are some actions that the Enumclaw City Council can take to dismantle systemic racism in our community:

  • Make racial bias education and training mandatory for all City employees and coordinate community trainings and regular forums for Enumclaw businesses, nonprofits, and the public

  • Conduct an independent review of all government programs and procedures to identify those that disregard or disproportionately affect BIPOC

  • Redesign police training to emphasize de-escalation and eliminate the use of force in all but the most extreme situations while establishing a more stringent policy to remove officers that abuse their power

  • Thoroughly evaluate past behavior of all hires, especially in the police department, for any signs of toxic actions or attitudes toward BIPOC

  • Re-allocate City funding to a wider range of community programs that address drug addiction, mental health, affordable housing, and inequality in Enumclaw and seek out community partnerships that can leverage funding to do the same

In this time of action, these steps are the minimum for any municipality. Enumclaw is not too small, too rural, nor too white to address the racist policies and practices that pervade policing and American government at all levels.

We all need to do more to make our community better. The time is now.

Sincerely,

Angie H., Laura P., Karen F., Ann W., Amy R., Julir W., Connie B., Dewey S., Kristine R., Meagan K., Carrie H., Maryanne T., Brienne D., Alyssa W., Danielle F., John and Doreen A., COry and Diane O., Kristin S., Eve W., Austin S.,

Sign the Enumclaw Letter

This petition is now closed.

End date: Jul 15, 2020

Signatures collected: 20

20 signatures

Voices Create Change

The legacy of violence and unjust treatment of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color in this country shows that oppression will not improve without the unwavering commitment of people of all backgrounds—especially privileged white people like myself—to demand real changes to make our communities safer, more just, and more equitable places to live.

Join me by signing this letter if you’re an Enumclaw citizen or downloading a copy to send to your city council. This is only one small step for regular citizens to have their voices heard. Together we must abolish the failing status quo and create a better world.

Bird Sounds: Dance to Your Own Music

Long after the mule deer curl up on their meadow mattresses, snipe dance with a courage that only the darkness can give.

From a damp stage, they dance by the romance of the moonlight and a trillion twinkling stars. The croaks of frogs act like the beats of a drum for the ethereal sound tracing their progress upward into the still mountain air.

The male snipe goes to great heights to impress a lucky spectator down below. An otherworldly whewhewhewhew emits from its slicing feathers as the snipe spirals skyward.

Spring Birdsong

red-winged blackbird singing
Red-winged blackbirds are among the most vociferous territorial defenders.

Spring bird sounds are always more than just sounds. They’re territorial warnings, pleas for food, or thousand-year-old courtship rituals.

This spring you can also listen for pods of dolphins, swirling in the depths of the deep blue sky above your head.

Swallows of all abodes—barn, tree, cliff, bank—playfully click, whistle, and chatter, mimicking oceanic orchestras as they swim through the sky.

Continue reading “Bird Sounds: Dance to Your Own Music”